Resources

Think about component footprint decisions

Throughout the schematic drawing phase, consider footprint and landpattern decisions that will need to be made in the layout phase. See the following suggestions for things to consider when making component choices based on part footprints.

Remember that footprints include both the electrical pad connections and the mechanical (X, Y and Z) dimensions of the part. This includes the body outline of the part as well as the pins that attach to the PCB. When selecting components, consider any housing or packing restrictions on both top and bottom sides of the final PCB. Some components (such as polarized capacitors) may have height clearance restrictions that need to be considered as part of the component selection process. When initially starting a design, consider drawing a basic board outline shape and placing some of the larger or criticallyplaced components (such as connectors) that are planned to be used. In this way, a quick virtual rendering of the board (without routing) can be visualized to give a relatively accurate representation of the relative positioning and component heights of the board and components. This will assist in ensuring that the parts will fit inside the packaging (plastic, chassis, mechanical frame, etc…) after the PCB is assembled. Invoke the 3D Preview mode from the tool menu to  review your board.

Landpatterns show the exact pads or hole shapes on the PCB to which the part will be soldered. These copper patterns on the PCB may also contain some basic shape information. The landpatterns need to be sized correctly to ensure proper soldering and to ensure proper mechanical and thermal integrity of the connecting parts. When designing the PCB layout consider how the board will be manufactured or if hand soldered, how the pads will be accessed. Reflow soldering (solder paste that is melted in a controlled oven) can handle a wide variety of surface mount devices (SMDs). Wave soldering is typically used to solder the backside of the board to fix throughhole components but can handle some SMD parts placed on the backside. Often with this technique, any bottom side SMDs will have to be orientated in a special direction and may to have pad modifications to be able to be soldered in this way.